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Review 'Stay Trippy': Juicy J Benefits From Being True To Himself

September 5th, 2013 9:20pm EDT | Brent Faulkner By: Brent Faulkner
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Juicy JJuicy J Benefits from Being True to Himself… Even if That’s Irresponsible… “I make money all day, then I ball with the profits / n***as hate on me, I tell em hatin’ n***as stop it…” It’s not the most endearing or intelligible lyric I’ve ever heard, but I’ll give it to Juicy J, you know exactly where he stands.  Best known for his work with Three Six Mafia and famously (or infamously) winning the Academy Award for Best Original Song (“It’s Hard Out Here For Pimp), Juicy is making his biggest solo splash ever, thanks to a little joint called “Bandz A Make Her Dance”.  Stay Trippy, the parent album, delivers multiple cuts keying in upon the success of the incredibly shallow, undeniably satisfying number.  The album is by no means deep, and while that should be a turn off, Stay Trippy actually is a solid album that finds Juicy J doing what he and Three-6-Mafia does best…playing on irresponsible, if appealing clichés of southern, hardcore rap.

Stop It”, the opener of which the aforementioned lyric was excerpted from, sets the tone for Stay Trippy. The cut is slickly produced and Juicy J is definitely a straight shooter: “Backstage, naked ladies / poppin’ pills and swallowing babies / bad b*****s ain’t come to play…” Not necessarily a highlighting number, “Stop It” is solid.  “Smokin’ Rollin’” is even better, sampling The Weeknd’s “High For This”.  At a brief 2:35, “Smokin’ Rollin’” packs a mighty punch, including a guest verse from the late Pimp C. Juicy J has his way, which is based around drugs: “Codeine in my system, man this life outstanding / feel like I’m on another planet, I don’t plan on landing…” No it’s not centered around more meaningful things like romance, world piece, or socioeconomic issues, but at least we know how much Juicy J likes to smoke and partake of ‘drank’.

On “No Heart No Love”, Juicy J grows violent: “I tell you one time, don’t play with my bread / n***a, you do, they gon’ find yo a$$ dead / body in trunk, hands tied to yo legs / tape on yo mouth, a hole in yo head…” Project Pat is no more forgiving on the third verse: “Fifty shots clear this b**ch out like a tornado / two choppas who identical – call ‘em Cain and Abel…” Don’t mess with Juicy, particularly as he counts his money on the predictable, though consistent “So Much Money” (“Thumbin’ through so much money, that I need three hands to count it…”).  An obligatory reference to ‘molly’ occurs (“I got your b**ch on a Molly, she ride me like a Ducati” as well as an allusion to himself (“I told ‘em “Bandz A Make Her Dance”, I turn my head, that sh*t charted”).  Again, it’s pretty simple-minded stuff, but it is what it is.